Sprang Weaving

Posted by Robin 12/10/2017 0 Comment(s)

 

Sprang is an ancient method of constructing fabric that gives it an appearance similar to netting so that it has natural elasticity. Sprang, unlike netting, however, is constructed from entirely warp threads. 
The sprang structure is close to a Leno weave but without the weft so that it is inherently flexible. 

 

Although examples of sprang can be seen back in the Bronze Age, there were no written records until the late nineteenth century.

 

These days knitting has taken over sprang constructions, however, there are many examples in museums of product woven in a sprang construction which is often misidentified as knitted. 

 

Wyedean possesses a sprang fabric hand loom,similar to the one in the picture, which, to the best of our knowledge is one of only two in existence, the other we understand is in London owned by the Royal School of Needlework. Our loom hasn’t been used for many years and was last used in the 1980s to manufacture British Army Generals Guards Full Dress and Undress waist sash ribbons, also for Scottish Regiment Officers’ shoulder sash, all woven in pure silk and 2% gold threads. Unfortunately, these products were converted over to power loom production using synthetic threads in the late 1980s as a cost saving measure. 

 

To view our range of sashes click here.

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